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1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving

Catherine O'Neil Grace, Margaret M. Bruchac, Plimoth Plantation

Countering the prevailing, traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, with its black-hatted, silver-buckled Pilgrims; blanket-clad, be-feathered Indians, this lushly illustrated photo-essay presents a more measured, balanced, and historically accurate version of the three-day harvest celebration in 1621. Pair this with resources teaching about harvest traditions specific to Oregon tribes!

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Under the harsh summer sun, Mari’s art class has begun. But it’s hard to think of anything to draw in a place where nothing beautiful grows — especially a place like Topaz, the internment camp where Mari’s family and thousands of other Japanese Americans have been sent to live during World War II. Somehow, glimmers of hope begin to surface — in the eyes of a kindly art teacher, in the tender words of Mari’s parents, and in the smile of a new friend. Amy Lee-Tai’s sensitive prose and Felicia Hoshino’s stunning mixed-media images show that hope can survive alongside even the harshest injustice.

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George Washington Carver often said that a weed is a flower growing in the wrong place. He might have said this of himself. The child of slaves, he grew up eager to learn, but unable to find a school in his neighborhood that would accept black students. It was twenty years before he had enough money saved to go to college, but eventually George Washington Carver became a professor at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. There he was able to teach poor farmers the value of plants such as the sweet potato and the peanut- crops that were almost unknown at the time, but for which he invented hundreds of uses.

Written and illustrated with affection for “a wonderful man who devoted his whole like to making life better for others,” Aliki’s biography tells the remarkable story of a great figure in African American history.

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Ag Today – Issue 4

National Agriculture in the Classroom

This six part series is a publication of National Agriculture in the Classroom. Issue four looks at how the global movement of agriculture products continue to be driven by economics, and consumer demand and preferences. Agriculture, food, and natural resource systems continue to play an integral role in the evolution of societies both in the United States and the world. Teacher guide is included.

Check out the e-book version and online teacher guide!
Please put the number of students in your class in the quantity section at checkout to ensure the correct number of supplies gets to you.

Additional publications: Ag Today Issue 1, Ag Today Issue 2Ag Today Issue 3, Ag Today Issue 5, Ag Today Issue 6

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Follow Julia Child—chef, author, and television personality—from her childhood in Pasadena, California, to her life as a spy in WWII, to the cooking classes she took in Paris, to the publication of Mastering the Art of French Cooking, to the funny moments of being a chef on TV. Use this book to teach about the diversity of careers available in the food system!

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This fascinating picture book biography tells the childhood story of Buffalo Bird Woman—a Hidatsa Indian born around 1839. Through her true story, readers learn what it was like to be part of this Native American community, which lived along the Missouri River in the Dakotas, a society that depended on agriculture for food and survival rather than hunting. This book leads well into discussions of agricultural practices used by Oregon tribes both historically and today.

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This is the story of maize and the Native American farmers who found and nourished it from a wild grass plant into the corn we know today. Clear accurate illustrations accompany text on each page.

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Diana Hopkins lived in a white house. THE White House. World War II is in full force across the seas. It’s 1943, President Roosevelt is in office, and Diana’s father, Harry Hopkins, is his chief advisor. And Diana wants to be part of the war effort. After some well-intentioned missteps (her quarantine sign on her father’s office door was not well-received), the President requests her help with his newest plan for the country’s survival: Victory Gardens!

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Based on true events, this fictional story traces the history of the Women’s Land Army during World War I. Real-life “Farmerette” Helen Stevens trains to farm the land, negotiates a position for herself and other women, and does her bit for the war effort. This unique book celebrates the true grit of U.S. American women.

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Dolores is a teacher, a mother, and a friend. She wants to know why her students are too hungry to listen, why they don’t have shoes to wear to school. Dolores is a warrior, an organizer, and a peacemaker. When she finds out that the farm workers in her community are poorly paid and working under dangerous conditions, she stands up for their rights.

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