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This beautiful 8.5 x 11 inch full color map of Washington County features unique commodities grown in the county. It is an excellent tool to bring a piece of the story one County plays in Oregon’s agricultural diversity to the classroom.

The Grown in Washington County Map helps students visualize where things are grown right in their backyard. On the back of the map student’s can learn some more information about the unique commodities grown in the County and how they support the diversity of Oregon agriculture.

Maps are free to Oregon teachers. If you would like a classroom set please let us know how many to send!

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Humongous Fungus

Lynne Boddy

Did you know that fungi are made to make medicine for humans? Or that the most mushrooms can be seen in autumn? This picture book about nature is packed with fun facts about fungi. It includes gross-out stories of fungal infections that kids will love, incredible facts about “bananageddon”, crop disease, epidemics, and zombified ants! It’s the ultimate gift for children who are interested in nature and microorganisms. Book must be returned.

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1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving (Classroom Set)

Catherine O'Neil Grace, Margaret M. Bruchac, Plimoth Plantation

Countering the prevailing, traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, with its black-hatted, silver-buckled Pilgrims; blanket-clad, be-feathered Indians, this lushly illustrated photo-essay presents a more measured, balanced, and historically accurate version of the three-day harvest celebration in 1621. Pair this with resources teaching about harvest traditions specific to Oregon tribes!

 

A Classroom set is is 15 copies of the book. Must Be returned.

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Bread Lab!

Kim Binczewski & Bethany Econopouly

It’s a sleepy Saturday morning for most people, but not for Iris, who has to feed her many pets before Aunt Mary arrives. Iris likes to call Aunt Mary “Plant Mary” because she is a plant scientist.

Today Aunt Mary wants to experiment with making whole wheat sourdough bread from scratch! As the family kitchen transforms into a bread lab, Iris is surprised that bread needs only four ingredients―flour, water, salt and starter. She also learns about the invisible microbes that make the dough rise, and how flour comes from wheat grown by farmers. It all seems magical, but it’s really science. This book needs to be returned. 

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Seed, Soil, Sun

Cris Peterson

Seed. Soil. Sun. With these simple ingredients, nature creates our food. This beautifully written book by Cris Peterson, brings both wonder and clarity to the subject of agriculture, celebrating the cycle of growth, harvest, and renewal. The photography that conveys this story is a perfect fit for this story. The companion book to the Seed, Soil, Sun lesson plan and the Seed, Soil, Sun Kit. Please check the kit out separately.

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After studying fish and their lifecycles in Oregon’s Interior Valleys (chapter 7) in the Get Oregonized text, rubber fish replicas allow students to create beautiful Gyotaku (fish prints). These rubber fish replicas are of chinook salmon, perfect for after a lesson on the state fish!

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1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving

Catherine O'Neil Grace, Margaret M. Bruchac, Plimoth Plantation

Countering the prevailing, traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, with its black-hatted, silver-buckled Pilgrims; blanket-clad, be-feathered Indians, this lushly illustrated photo-essay presents a more measured, balanced, and historically accurate version of the three-day harvest celebration in 1621. Pair this with resources teaching about harvest traditions specific to Oregon tribes!

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A Pill Bug’s Life

John Himmelman

Have you ever wondered how some of nature’s smallest creatures spend their days? Here’s your chance to take a scientifically accurate peek at the world from their point of view. The striking illustrations and lively story-line in this book follow a pill bug as it hunts for food, faces its enemies, and interacts with humans. This book pairs well with lessons on forest ecology, compost, and soil health.

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A Place to Grow

Stephanie Bloom

No matter where it lands or how desperately it hopes, the tiny seed can’t find a place to grow. Will the tiny seed ever find a home, or will it keep searching and floating forever? With playful charm and touching insight, A Place to Grow joyfully affirms that there is a special place, plan and purpose for each of us. This book is a part of the JMG Learn, Eat, & Go Curriculum.

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Under the harsh summer sun, Mari’s art class has begun. But it’s hard to think of anything to draw in a place where nothing beautiful grows — especially a place like Topaz, the internment camp where Mari’s family and thousands of other Japanese Americans have been sent to live during World War II. Somehow, glimmers of hope begin to surface — in the eyes of a kindly art teacher, in the tender words of Mari’s parents, and in the smile of a new friend. Amy Lee-Tai’s sensitive prose and Felicia Hoshino’s stunning mixed-media images show that hope can survive alongside even the harshest injustice.

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