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Lesson Plan Categories
Porcupine meatballs are fun, kid-friendly food, made with ground beef, rice, onion, tomato soup, and seasonings.
No Cook Peppermints

45 min lesson

Peppermint is often used as flavoring in tea, ice cream, candy, chewing gum, and toothpaste. Peppermint can also be found in some shampoos and soaps. Make peppermints with your students!!
Here’s a quick, tasty, and nutritious spread. It’s just like Nutella, but homemade.
Oregon Commodity Granola

45 min lesson

This recipe was adapted from one made by the 4-H Multiologist Club, Lincoln County, Oregon 2010. “We have been studying Oregon’s commodities. This recipe was adapted to create an energizing and healthy granola mix that incorporates many tasty products that are grown in our state. We doubled the batch and made one wheat free and one regular. We also used apricot nectar in one batch and peach nectar in the other. This is great as a snack or in a bowl with milk. YUM!” - Shelley Spangler, 4-H Multiologist Club, Newport
Edible Soil Layers

45 min lesson

Create these edible dirt cakes for a special classroom event or for a celebration at the end of your plant unit.
This lesson investigates the miraculous process of air and water combining with seeds, soil and sunlight to create nearly all the food we eat. By having students observe different types of seeds, this lesson takes plant germination one step further by having students record the differing growth rates and other observations in germination journals (template provided).
While most plants grow from seeds, many can also be grown from bulbs, tubers or stem cuttings. This is called vegetative propagation. It is used in agriculture for growing many types of plants in the nursery and greenhouse industry, as well as for raising crops like potatoes and garlic.
Students learn about the super food that is the potato and how just a little bit of water can lead to a whole new plant.
Apples and onions are agricultural products. It is easy to tell the difference between them, just with our sense of taste. Yet, our visual and smell of the food affects what it tastes like. This lesson teaches students the importance of our senses interacting with each other when eating and finding distinguishable taste differences.
Monocots and Dicots

30 min lesson

In this lesson students set up a side-by-side germination experiment of monocot and dicot seeds. They will observe differences and similarities of these two types of flowering plants at the germination level, specifically the number of cotyledons. Students can record their findings daily. This is a great way to begin a flowering plant unit