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Where Does Food Come From?

Shelley Rotner, Gary Goss

The supermarket is the place where you buy your food, but have you ever wondered where you favorite foods really come from? A lot of food comes from plants or from animals. but it might surprise you to know that some of the food you eat comes from bees or from seawater. Where does you favorite food come from? Find out in the fun, colorful, easy to read book!

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From Farm to Table

Richard and Louise Spilsbury

This books gives your students an accurate look at food and farming from production to plate, preservation to packaging, to the dinner table!

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The Beeman

Laurie Krebs, Valerie Cis

Told from the viewpoint of a child whose Grandpa is a beekeeper, this rhyming text offers an accessible and engaging introduction to the behavior of bees, including: where they live, how honey is made, and what a beekeeper does. The companion book to the Busy Bees lesson plan and the Busy Bees Kit. Please check the kit out separately.

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Every wonder how wheat goes from a plant to bread? This simple to follow book outlines the basic steps. A great book for young readers.

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Tops and Bottoms

Janet Stevens

Hare solves his family’s problems by tricking rich and lazy Bear in this funny, energetic version of an old slave story. With roots in American slave tales, Tops & Bottoms celebrates the trickster tradition of using one’s wits to overcome hardship. “As usual, Stevens’ animal characters, bold and colorful, are delightful. . . . It’s all wonderful fun, and the book opens, fittingly, from top to bottom instead of from side to side, making it perfect for story-time sharing.”

 

Beautiful pictures and a childish story of plants and harvesting the “tops and the bottoms”.

IsabellaD

A student’s depiction of Tops and Bottoms!

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What’s in the Garden?

Marianne Berkes

Good food doesn’t begin on a store shelf with a box. It comes from a garden bursting with life, color, sounds, smells, sunshine, moisture, birds, and bees! Healthy food becomes much more interesting when children know where they come from. So what’s in the garden? Kids will find a variety fruits and vegetables, and a tasty, kid-friendly recipe for each one to start a lifetime of good eating. A food for thought section presents interesting facts about each fruit and vegetable, and a how does your garden grow? section explains facts about gardening and the parts of plants.

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From Wheat to Bread

Kristin Thomas Keller

From Wheat to Bread provides an introduction to the basic concepts of food production, distribution, and consumption by tracing the production of bread from wheat.

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Eat This!

Andrea Curtis

“Eat This!” is an effective analysis of varied marketing tactics to persuade younger consumers to eat non-nutritious or junk food, with specific suggestions for ways to avoid being overly influenced by media publicity tactics in food choices, and ways to request or encourage food providers to offer a wider range of healthy choices of foods targeted towards kids.

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In “Honey Bees: Letters From the Hive,” bee expert Stephen Buchmann takes readers on an incredible tour. Enter a beehive–one part nursery, one part honey factory, one part queen bee sanctum–then fly through backyard gardens, open fields, and deserts where wildflowers bloom.

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The Incredible Egg – 4-H Classroom Curriculum Guide

Oregon State University Extension

This unique educational unit integrates the concept of chick embryology into easy-to-use math, science, and language arts lesson plans. One of the unique features of this educational unit is that you do not have to incubate eggs to achieve the learning objectives (although hatching chicks in your classroom will definitely enhance the lessons). Oregon State University Extension Service developed the materials. Some county OSU Extension Office may help locate fertile eggs and provide the necessary equipment.

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