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Maxine and her friend Leo are makers. Maxine’s style is functional. Leo’s style is artistic. Together, They’re determined to make one spectacular garden, including a pond for Maxine’s fabulous goldfish Milton! But their garden attracts all sorts of visitors, with rabbits and squirrels and raccoons feasting on their veggies. Now Maxine and Leo must work together to try (and try and try again) to find a way to save their garden.

 

Perfect for STEM and maker spaces, this book is sure to inspire creative thinkers and tinkerers everywhere!

 

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‘Til the Cows Come Home

Jodi Icenoggle

The author lassos a traditional Jewish folktale, "The Button Story", sets it in the American West, and rigs it up with tongue-tingling cowboy language to create an engaging story.

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Invites young readers to find various quantities of such things as farm animals and tools which are labeled in the illustrations of rural scenes, including a sheep farm, an orchard, a rice paddy, and bee hives. This book needs to be returned. 

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1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving

Catherine O'Neil Grace, Margaret M. Bruchac, Plimoth Plantation

Countering the prevailing, traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, with its black-hatted, silver-buckled Pilgrims; blanket-clad, be-feathered Indians, this lushly illustrated photo-essay presents a more measured, balanced, and historically accurate version of the three-day harvest celebration in 1621. Pair this with resources teaching about harvest traditions specific to Oregon tribes!

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A Pill Bug’s Life

John Himmelman

Have you ever wondered how some of nature’s smallest creatures spend their days? Here’s your chance to take a scientifically accurate peek at the world from their point of view. The striking illustrations and lively story-line in this book follow a pill bug as it hunts for food, faces its enemies, and interacts with humans. This book pairs well with lessons on forest ecology, compost, and soil health.

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A Place to Grow

Stephanie Bloom

No matter where it lands or how desperately it hopes, the tiny seed can’t find a place to grow. Will the tiny seed ever find a home, or will it keep searching and floating forever? With playful charm and touching insight, A Place to Grow joyfully affirms that there is a special place, plan and purpose for each of us. This book is a part of the JMG Learn, Eat, & Go Curriculum.

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Under the harsh summer sun, Mari’s art class has begun. But it’s hard to think of anything to draw in a place where nothing beautiful grows — especially a place like Topaz, the internment camp where Mari’s family and thousands of other Japanese Americans have been sent to live during World War II. Somehow, glimmers of hope begin to surface — in the eyes of a kindly art teacher, in the tender words of Mari’s parents, and in the smile of a new friend. Amy Lee-Tai’s sensitive prose and Felicia Hoshino’s stunning mixed-media images show that hope can survive alongside even the harshest injustice.

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Where Does Food Come From?

Shelley Rotner, Gary Goss

The supermarket is the place where you buy your food, but have you ever wondered where you favorite foods really come from? A lot of food comes from plants or from animals. but it might surprise you to know that some of the food you eat comes from bees or from seawater. Where does you favorite food come from? Find out in the fun, colorful, easy to read book!

This book needs to be returned. 

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A Pocketful of Goobers

Barbara Mitchell

This book relates the scientific efforts of George Washington Carver, especially his production of more than 300 uses for the peanut. This book needs to be returned. 

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George Washington Carver often said that a weed is a flower growing in the wrong place. He might have said this about himself. As the child of slaves, he grew up eager to learn, but was unable to find a school in his neighborhood that would accept black students. It was twenty years before he had enough money saved to go to college, but eventually George Washington Carver became a professor at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. There he was able to teach poor farmers the value of plants such as the sweet potato and the peanut – crops that were almost unknown at the time, but for which he invented hundreds of uses.

Written and illustrated with affection for “a wonderful man who devoted his whole life to making life better for others,” Aliki’s biography tells the remarkable story of a great figure in African American history who is now recognized as the most prominent Black scientist of the early twentieth century. This book needs to be returned. 

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